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3 Times Movie Stars Nailed Business Advice

Entertainment Quotes

The 90th Academy Awards have come and gone leaving behind a truly phenomenal Jennifer Garner meme, the improved Google search ranking of “inclusion rider”, and a golden statue for a film about a fish-romance.

Awards season is a great reminder that celebrities are employees too. And they’re good for more than just getting sloshed at the Golden Globes. Whether they’re on-screen or off, actors can drop impactful truth bombs. These three movie stars, in particular, have great advice and observations that can truly apply to running a business.

Don’t believe us? BEHOLD! The power of the silver screen!

Details matter.

Jack Black is our 2018 mood. He is so audacious he has built his career on big comedy— over-the-top reactions, full-body gyrations, and when to hit that high note.

But his true business genius shines with this quote:

“You must never underestimate the power of the eyebrow.”

Why? Well, that’s his personal trademark—it’s a small detail but it’s the most impactful part of his performance.

And it’s not only Black that utilizes this secret weapon! Think Leonard Nimoy, Jack Nicholson, and John Belushi. One look and their faces go from ordinary to iconic.

So how does this apply to your business? A strong eyebrow game might not help when you meet a prospective client. But the importance of paying attention to the details can greatly impact your business. Details often define your brand and your purpose, from the quality of your packaging to the standards embodied by your customer service or support team. Details set you apart from your competitors. Find those small details that reflect your purpose and perspective as a company, and you’re well on your way to A-list results.

Fail.

“If you know you are going to fail, then fail gloriously!” (Cate Blanchett)

This quote is especially ironic since Cate Blanchett is seemingly flawless—but she’s got a good point.

Businesses are measured by success. Profit up? Yes! Successful launch of a new product? Yes! Landing that hot PR coverage? Yes! Great job all around. Let’s grab a La Croix and celebrate.

Failures, however, don’t merit celebrations. They uncover bad leadership, poor vision, and disjointed execution. They uncover an inability to deliver as promised. Failures show you’re worse than you expected—failures keep your therapist in business.

But failure is a part of success. It makes you wiser. And it gives you insight into yourself, your company, and your grit. Most importantly, failures show you can take risks and innovate. You won’t get ahead in business with a failed performance, but you will learn from one.

Don’t cheap out on technology.

“Before you marry a person, you should first make them use a computer with slow Internet to see who they really are.” (Will Ferrell)  

Businesses run on technology. You may operate a chain of corner stores. A restaurant. A consulting firm. No matter what you do, technology is the backbone of operations.

Now, we’re not saying to blow the budget on the most expensive technology around. Rather, be mindful of what technology benefits your business and then make the appropriate investments.

Approach evaluating and purchasing technological solutions with a strategic eye. Which solutions will help you run your business more efficiently? Or save you valuable time while giving you greater insight into your company? Which products are recommended by people you respect, like your accountant or a colleague? Saying no to extraneous purchases is important, but so is investing in technology that can be valuable to your business.

Like the greatest stars of our generation, always remember that what makes your business unique is you! As George Lucas said, “All the skill in the world won’t help you unless you have something to say.”

March 6, 2018
Kate Wilson
Social Media Manager, Bill.com
Kate is in charge of all things social at Bill.com. When she's not writing every type of content imaginable, she's drinking strong coffee and debating the use of the Oxford comma with her coworkers.